Copyright © 1996 William B. Ackerman


SDTTY DEMO

Here is a demonstration of the use of sdtty, illustrating various concepts and other capabilities. You should follow along on your computer. You must use sdtty version 31.67 or later.

We will write a long and horrible sequence that illustrates a number of things that the program can do, and shows how you can get it to do them.

First, we start the program. We will run it at C2.

If using DOS or UNIX, type sdtty and press <ENTER> at the prompt:

     C:\SD> sdtty <ENTER>

If using Windows, click on the sdtty icon. In either case, you should see:

     Enter the level:

The program wants us to type the level. Type c2 and press <ENTER>:

     Enter the level: c2 <ENTER>
     Sd: reading database............................................done
     SD -- square dance caller's helper.
     
     Copyright (c) 1991-1996 William B. Ackerman
        and Stephen Gildea.
     SD comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY;
        for details see the license.
     This is free software, and you are
        welcome to redistribute it.
     
     At any time that you don't know what you can type,
     type a question mark (?).  The program will show you all
     legal choices.
     
     Version Sd 31.67 : db31.67 : ui1.8tty     C2
     Output file is "sequence.C2"
     Enter startup command>

After displaying all the introductory stuff, the program wants us to enter a startup command. The line

     Enter startup command>

is called a prompt. If we type a question mark at this point, it will list the possible things we could type. Here is what it displays:

     Enter startup command> ?
     exit from the program
     heads 1p2p
     sides 1p2p
     heads start
     sides start
     just as they are
     toggle concept levels
     toggle active phantoms
     change output file
     change title
     
     Enter startup command>

It displays a number of choices, and then gives us another prompt. We will type heads start, and press <ENTER>:

     Enter startup command> heads start <ENTER>
     Sd 31.67 : db31.67 : ui1.8tty     C2
     
     
      4B>   3GV   3BV   2G<
     
      4G>   1B^   1G^   2B<
     
      1:   HEADS
     -->

It displays some bookkeeping information, and shows us the setup with the heads in the middle, waiting for a call. Below that, it shows the current line of our sequence. It is line 1, and all it knows so far is that it is going to start with heads.

The --> prompt is the general prompt that it gives when it wants us to enter a call.

If we were to type question mark at this point, it would show over 500 possible calls, concepts, and other commands, so we won't do it for this demo (though you may wish to try it).

We type pass the ocean, and press <ENTER>.

     --> pass the ocean <ENTER>
      1:   HEADS pass the ocean
     
            1B>
      4B>   1G<   2G<
      4G>   3G>   2B<
            3B<
     
      2:
     (diamond/qtag)-->

It has now done the call. The first line of the sequence is now complete: HEADS pass the ocean. This line will be printed on the finished sequence. It shows the result setup, shows that line 2 has nothing on it yet, and gives us another prompt. The time, the prompt reminds us that we are in diamonds or quarter tags.

We type extend and press <ENTER>.

     (diamond/qtag)--> extend <ENTER>
     Sd 31.67 : db31.67 : ui1.8tty     C2
     
      1:   HEADS pass the ocean
     
            1B>
      4B>   1G<   2G<
      4G>   3G>   2B<
            3B<
     
      2:   extend
     
      4B>   1B>
     
      1G<   2G<
     
      4G>   3G>
     
      3B<   2B<
     
      3:
     (waves)-->

It shows the full sequence that we have so far. After it does any call, it shows a picture of the setup before and after. In this case, it has done the extend on line 2, and is showing the setup before and after. Those pictures will not be printed on the final sequence (unless we request that the program do so, by giving the keep picture command). The pictures before and after the last call are displayed on the screen just so we can be sure that we agree with what the computer did.

The prompt shows that we are in waves.

We want to do a tandem swing thru at this point. Tandem is a concept.

There are two ways of dealing with concepts. One is to type just the concept name, press <ENTER>, type the call name, and press <ENTER> again. This method is less convenient, but it always works.

The more convenient way is simply to type the concept(s) and call all on one line, followed by <ENTER>, as in tandem swing thru <ENTER>.

It won't make any difference in the final printout which method you used.

The significance of this is discussed in more detail in the “Entering Concepts” chapter of the reference manual. For the purposes of this demo, we will use the one-line method wherever possible. So we type tandem swing thru, and press <ENTER>.

     (waves)--> tandem swing thru <ENTER>
      1:   HEADS pass the ocean
      2:   extend
     
      4B>   1B>
     
      1G<   2G<
     
      4G>   3G>
     
      3B<   2B<
     
      3:   TANDEM swing thru
     
      2G>   1G>
     
      3B<   2B<
     
      4B>   1B>
     
      3G<   4G<
     
     
          resolve is:
     extend, right and left grand  (1/4 promenade)
      4:
     (waves)-->

It is now showing us 3 lines. There are pictures of the setup before and after the tandem swing thru, but it is not showing earlier pictures. It assumes we are satisfied with what went on previously.

Line 4 is now blank and ready to be filled in.

The program has noticed that we happen to be in a setup from which we could say extend, right and left grand, and is pointing that out to us. If we wanted to end the sequence right here, we could do so (by typing write this sequence or pressing <F10>). Instead, we are going to continue, and forget all about that resolve.

Let's demonstrate some concepts that identify people. We will do a 1/2 acey deucey to make a 3x1 diamond setup.

Type 1/2 acey deucey, and press <ENTER>.

     --> 1/2 acey deucey <ENTER>
      2:   extend
      3:   TANDEM swing thru
     
      2G>   1G>
     
      3B<   2B<
     
      4B>   1B>
     
      3G<   4G<
     
      4:   1/2, acey deucey
     
                   2G>
     
      3G^  3BV  4B^  2BV  1B^  1GV
     
                   4G<
     
      5:
     -->

The program puts commas in the final sequence where needed for clarity. You never type them in.

It now shows us the full line 4, and the 3x1 diamond that resulted. It places a comma after some concepts to make everything completely unambiguous. You never need to type the commas.

As the sequence progresses, early parts of it may scroll off the top of the screen and be invisible. Note that, in this example, we have not shown line 1, but are only showing the last few calls. How much you see on your screen may be different. Don't worry, the computer remembers the whole sequence and will print it all out when we are done.

We would like the girls to circulate in the big diamond around the outside. We must use the disconnected concept to do this. The disconnected concept is C2. Now it happens that you could almost certainly get dancers to do what you want at lower levels by saying girls diamond circulate around the outside, or something like that, but the program doesn't know that. It insists on meticulously correct use of concepts. If we wanted to do this at a level below C2, we would therefore have to tell the program that we really want to use a concept that isn't legitimate. We can do this by giving the toggle concept levels command. But in the present situation we don't need to do that, because we are running the program at C2. So we use the girls disconnected concept. There are <anyone> disconnected concepts for a number of designators, such as boys, girls, heads, sides, centers, ends, beaus, belles, etc. Many of them would of course be illegal in the present context, but girls disconnected is legal.

     --> girls disconnected diamond circulate <ENTER>
      3:   TANDEM swing thru
      4:   1/2, acey deucey
     
                   2G>
     
      3G^  3BV  4B^  2BV  1B^  1GV
     
                   4G<
     
      5:   GIRLS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   3G>
     
      4G^  3BV  4B^  2BV  1B^  2GV
     
                   1G<
     
      6:
     -->

The program shows a few calls back, and the just-completed call with pictures before and after. We can use other designators also. Let's do a heads disconnected diamond circulate at this point. As usual, we will type the concept and the call, and press <ENTER>.

The program responds by showing this:

     --> heads disconnected diamond circulate <ENTER>
      4:   1/2, acey deucey
      5:   GIRLS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   3G>
     
      4G^  3BV  4B^  2BV  1B^  2GV
     
                   1G<
     
      6:   HEADS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   1B<
     
      4G^  1G^  4B^  2BV  3GV  2GV
     
                   3B>
     
      7:
     -->

We could have the boys diamond circulate. They are not disconnected, so we just use the boys concept. As with disconnected, there are boys, girls, centers, ends, leads, trailers, etc. concepts. From now on, we will usually not describe in detail the act of entering concepts and calls.

     --> boys diamond circulate <ENTER>
      5:   GIRLS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
      6:   HEADS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   1B<
     
      4G^  1G^  4B^  2BV  3GV  2GV
     
                   3B>
     
      7:   BOYS diamond circulate
     
                   4B>
     
      4G^  1G^  1BV  3B^  3GV  2GV
     
                   2B<

We could also have designated them as the centers, since the centers of a 3x1 diamond is the center diamond. Let's try it. But first, let's undo the boys diamond circulate that we just entered. The undo command does this. There are two ways of entering this command. One way, of course, is to type undo, and press <ENTER>. (The full name of the command is undo last call, but we just need to type undo. The program will show the full name.) The other way is to press function key <F9>. Many function keys are arranged to perform common operations. The list is given in the “Terminal Interface” chapter of the reference manual.

     --> undo last call <ENTER>
      5:   GIRLS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   3G>
     
      4G^  3BV  4B^  2BV  1B^  2GV
     
                   1G<
     
      6:   HEADS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   1B<
     
      4G^  1G^  4B^  2BV  3GV  2GV
     
                   3B>
     
      7:
     -->

The program has erased the boys diamond circulate, and is showing us the last few calls of the remaining sequence. It is prompting us for the new line 7. Have the centers diamond circulate, by typing centers diamond circulate, and pressing <ENTER>.

     --> centers diamond circulate <ENTER>
      5:   GIRLS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
      6:   HEADS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   1B<
     
      4G^  1G^  4B^  2BV  3GV  2GV
     
                   3B>
     
      7:   CENTERS diamond circulate
     
                   4B>
     
      4G^  1G^  1BV  3B^  3GV  2GV
     
                   2B<

There is also a center diamond concept. So let's undo the last call, either by typing the command name or by pressing <F9>, and try it.

     --> <F9>
      5:   GIRLS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   3G>
     
      4G^  3BV  4B^  2BV  1B^  2GV
     
                   1G<
     
      6:   HEADS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   1B<
     
      4G^  1G^  4B^  2BV  3GV  2GV
     
                   3B>
     
      7:
     --> center diamond diamond circulate <ENTER>
      5:   GIRLS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
      6:   HEADS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     
                   1B<
     
      4G^  1G^  4B^  2BV  3GV  2GV
     
                   3B>
     
      7:   CENTER DIAMOND diamond circulate
     
                   4B>
     
      4G^  1G^  1BV  3B^  3GV  2GV
     
                   2B<
     
      8:
     -->

Now we would like to have the heads in the center wave do a swing thru. We can't say centers, because the centers of a 3x1 diamond are the center diamond, not the center line. Instead, we use the center 1x4 concept.

                   4B>
     
      4G^  1G^  1BV  3B^  3GV  2GV
     
                   2B<
     
      8:   CENTER 1X4 swing thru
     
                   4B>
     
      4G^  1B^  3GV  1G^  3BV  2GV
     
                   2B<

The concept is called center 1x4 instead of center line or center wave or center column because otherwise it would lead to a proliferation of concept names that basically do the same thing. When reading the card, you should probably say “center wave of 4,” or something like that.

Of course, instead of center 1x4, we could have designated the people directly, since they are the heads. Let's have them trade the wave to demonstrate that:

                   4B>
     
      4G^  1B^  3GV  1G^  3BV  2GV
     
                   2B<
     
      9:   HEADS trade the wave
     
                   4B>
     
      4G^  1GV  3B^  1BV  3G^  2GV
     
                   2B<

Now we would like to have the center wave of 6 do a grand swing thru. We use the center 1x6 concept:

                   4B>
     
      4G^  1GV  3B^  1BV  3G^  2GV
     
                   2B<
     
     10:   CENTER 1X6 GRAND swing thru
     
                   4B>
     
      1G^  1BV  4G^  2GV  3B^  3GV
     
                   2B<

Incidentally, grand is a concept. So, if we were typing concepts one at a time, we could have typed center 1x6, pressed <ENTER>, grand, pressed <ENTER>, and swing thru, and pressed <ENTER> a third time. Of course, we don't bother with that. Just type center 1x6 grand swing thru and press <ENTER>.

Let's have the centers flip the diamond while the ends explode. For this we use the centers (while the others) concept. As usual, there is a whole series of these concepts, for centers, heads, sides, leads, trailers, and so on.

Yes, the concept actually looks like that when we type it in. It even has to have the parentheses. The program will print it out on the card looking much better than that, but, while we type it in, the name of the concept is “centers (while the others)”.

A very important thing you need to know is that one-line entry is not allowed for those concepts that take two calls. Therefore, you must type the name of the concept, press <ENTER>, and type each of the two calls, pressing <ENTER> after each one.

Now, because of the completion property of Sdtty, we don't have to type the whole name “centers (while the others)”. As soon as we have typed the left parenthesis, the program knows what concept it has to be.

One thing we could do is type centers ( and then press <ESC>. The program will put the rest of the concept on the screen just as though we had typed it.

     --> centers ( <ESC>

the screen now shows

     --> centers (while the others)

because the program has typed while the others) for us. We can now press <ENTER> to tell the program that we want that concept.

Another thing we could have done, if we were really sure we knew what we wanted without seeing it, is to just press <ENTER> after typing centers (, without pressing <ESC>.

Either way, the program takes the centers (while the others) concept, and gives us another prompt. This is the prompt for the call that we want the centers to do.

     --> centers (while the others)
     11:   CENTERS
     -->

Line 11 just says CENTERS. It will say more very soon. At the prompt, we type flip the diamond, and press <ENTER>.

     --> flip the diamond <ENTER>
     11:   CENTERS flip the diamond
     ENTER SECOND CALL
     -->

Line 11 is looking more complete. We are given another prompt, with special instructions. It wants the second call. This is, of course, the call for the ends. Type explode, and press <ENTER>.

     ENTER SECOND CALL
     --> explode <ENTER>
      9:   HEADS trade the wave
     10:   CENTER 1X6 GRAND swing thru
     
                   4B>
     
      1G^  1BV  4G^  2GV  3B^  3GV
     
                   2B<
     
     11:   CENTERS flip the diamond WHILE THE ENDS explode
       Warning:  Ends should opt for setup parallel to their
        original line -- concentric rule does not apply.
     
            4G>
      1G>   4B<   3B<
      1B>   2B>   3G<
            2G<
     
     12:
     (diamond/qtag)-->

Line 11 is finished. As promised, it looks much better than it did when we typed it in. The program knows that the others are actually the ends, and it has put the whole thing into a reasonable word order. The program's exact wording may not always be ideal—you are responsible for using the right words when you call the card.

The program has put a warning into the sequence, in case someone mistakenly thinks that the opposite elongation rule for the concentric concept somehow applies here. Warnings are printed in a wide variety of situations, if the program thinks that there might be some danger of misinterpretation. In most cases, you should not read the warnings when calling.

(Incidentally, instead of centers (while the others), we could have said sides (while the others). If we had done this, the sequence would of course say “SIDES flip the diamond WHILE THE HEADS explode”.)

To prepare for what comes next, do a chain reaction and ah so.

     12:   chain reaction
     
      4B>   1B>
     
      2G<   1G<
     
      3G>   4G>
     
      3B<   2B<
     
     13:   ah so
     
      3B>   2G>   2B>   1G>
     
      3G<   4B<   4G<   1B<
     
     
          resolve is:
     reverse single file promenade  (1/4 promenade)

The program reminds us that we have stumbled into a resolve. We're not interested.

Have the ends hinge, by typing ends hinge, and <ENTER>. (We could have said heads instead of ends, of course.)

     14:   ENDS hinge
     
              2G>  2B>
      3G^ 3BV          1B^ 1GV
              4B<  4G<

The boys have a distorted facing diamond. We can use the boys in your distorted diamond concept to have them diamond circulate.

     15:   BOYS IN YOUR DISTORTED DIAMOND diamond circulate
     
              2G>  1B<
      3G^ 4B^          2BV 1GV
              3B>  4G<

Have the centers left touch 1/4.

     16:   CENTERS LEFT touch 1/4
     
              1BV  2G^
      3G^ 4B^          2BV 1GV
              4GV  3B^

Now the girls have a distorted wave, and can swing thru.

     17:   GIRLS IN YOUR DISTORTED WAVE swing thru
     
              1BV  3G^
      4G^ 4B^          2BV 2GV
              1GV  3B^

Have the heads trail off, then everyone crossfire.

     18:   HEADS trail off
     
      4G^  4B^  3GV  3BV  1B^  1G^  2BV  2GV
     
     19:   crossfire
     
      3G^   4GV   2B^   1BV
     
      3B^   4BV   2G^   1GV

Have the leads press ahead to make blocks. Incidentally, when we type leads press ahead, the program does not consider “leads” to be a concept. The name of the call is simply leads press ahead. The same is true of all the other little press-and-truck calls, like quarter left, quarter right, u-turn back, and shove off. Of course, this point is of little concern to us at present. We just type leads press ahead.

     20:   leads press ahead
     
      3G^    .    2B^    .
     
       .    4GV    .    1BV
     
      3B^    .    2G^    .
     
       .    4BV    .    1GV

We have a diagonal wave of four. We can use the diagonal wave concept.

     21:   DIAGONAL WAVE swing thru
     
      4G^    .    2B^    .
     
       .    1GV    .    1BV
     
      3B^    .    3G^    .
     
       .    4BV    .    2GV

(We could also have identified the people in that wave, by using the girls in your diagonal wave concept.)

There are also two diagonal waves of 3, or two diagonal columns of three, depending on what we want to do. Let's have them identify columns and do a magic circulate. The name of the concept is diagonal columns of 3.

     22:   DIAGONAL COLUMNS OF 3 MAGIC circulate
     
      4G^    .    3G^    .
     
       .    1BV    .    2BV
     
      4B^    .    3B^    .
     
       .    1GV    .    2GV

Have the girls u-turn back and press ahead.

     23:   girls U-turn back
     
      4GV    .    3GV    .
     
       .    1BV    .    2BV
     
      4B^    .    3B^    .
     
       .    1G^    .    2G^
     
     24:   girls press ahead
     
      4GV   1BV   3GV   2BV
     
      4B^   1G^   3B^   2G^

For the next item, do cross the K, and then have the boys single wheel.

     25:   cross the K
     
      1GV   2GV   4BV   3BV
     
      1B^   2B^   4G^   3G^
     
     26:   BOYS single wheel
       Warning:  Check a 'C1 phantom' setup.
     
          .          4B^
      1GV   2GV    .     .
          .          3B^
     
         1BV          .
       .     .    4G^   3G^
         2BV          .

Do a siamese trail to a diamond.

     27:   SIAMESE trail to a diamond
     
            3G<
      3BV         2B^
            4G<
     
            2G>
      4BV         1B^
            1G>

We now want to unwrap the interlocked diamonds. We can type this in any of three ways. Interlocked, like grand, cross, magic, left, single, split, and those sorts of things, is considered by the program to be a concept. As such, we could type interlocked unwrap the diamonds <ENTER>. We could also type unwrap the interlocked diamonds directly, with the word order the way it is supposed to be. A number of calls that take magic, interlocked, cross, and left modifiers with unusual word order can be typed in that exact word order. It isn't easy to know which ones, so it is always safe to type the concept name first and then see what happens. No matter how we type it, it gets printed out with the correct word order.

     28:   unwrap the interlocked diamonds
     
      2GV   1B^
     
      2BV   1G^
     
      3GV   4B^
     
      3BV   4G^

Let's have the column circulate one and a half times. There is a 1-1/2 concept (in fact, there is a 1-M/N concept for any reasonable value of M and N). There is actually a hyphen (minus sign) in the concept name, to avoid confusion when looking at the card. However, you don't need to type the hyphen. You can just type 1 1/2.

     --> 1 1/2 column circulate <ENTER>
     29:   column circulate 1-1/2
     
        1G<
      1BV 4B^
      2GV 4G^
      2BV 3B^
        3G>

The program has moved the phrase 1-1/2 to the end when it displays the line, and it will also do so in the printed card. It does the same with the concepts twice and <n> times. You must still type all concepts before the calls that they modify.

Let's have the boys hinge.

     30:   BOYS hinge
     
         1G<
     
         4B<
     
         1B>
     
      2GV   4G^
     
         3B<
     
         2B>
     
         3G>

The boys were in a disconnected setup. Why didn't we need to say boys disconnected hinge? The reason is that hinge is just a two-person call, and the people actually doing each hinge were right next to each other. If we had instead wanted the boys to do a box circulate, we would have had to say disconnected.

Have the center diamond flip the diamond, and then do a wheel and deal and tag your neighbor.

     33:   tag your neighbor
     
      3G<   2G<
     
      1B>   4B>
     
      2B<   3B<
     
      4G>   1G>

Do a sets in motion but hold the column.

     34:   sets in motion but hold the column
     
                   1G<
     
      2G>  2B>  3B>  1B<  4B<  4G<
     
                   3G>

The call sets in motion but hold the column is simply a call with a very long name. There is no but hold the column concept.

We can have the four in the middle do a swing thru. The head boys will step to right hands and begin the call, and then finish with the head girls. We can use the centers, or center diamond, or heads concept. As discussed above, the centers in a 3x1 diamond (which is what this is, even though people are facing in unusual directions) are the center diamond.

     35:   CENTERS swing thru
       Warning:  Some people step to a wave.
     
                1B<
                1G>
      2G> 2B>         4B< 4G<
                3G<
                3B>

Let's have the centers mix.

     36:   CENTERS mix
     
                3G>
                3B<
      2G> 2B>         4B< 4G<
                1B>
                1G<

This would be a good time to demonstrate the <anyone> are tandem concept. There are such concepts (and for as couples too, of course), for all the usual designators. In this case, we will say sides are tandem.

     --> sides are tandem swing and circle 1/4 <ENTER>
     37:   SIDES ARE TANDEM, swing and circle 1/4
     
         2G>   2B>
            1G<
      1B>         3B<
            3G>
         4B<   4G<

The program put in a comma for us.

Have the centers extend, all trade circulate, and do another sets in motion but hold the column to demonstrate the next thing.

     38:   CENTERS extend
     
      2G>   2B>
     
      1G<   3B<
     
      1B>   3G>
     
      4B<   4G<
     
     39:   trade circulate
     
      3B<   3G<
     
      4B>   2G>
     
      4G<   2B<
     
      1G>   1B>
     
     40:   sets in motion but hold the column
     
                   1B<
     
      3G>  4G>  2B>  4B<  2G<  1G<
     
                   3B>

We are going to have the center column of 6 do a single file dixie sashay, with the girls in tandem. We need to use the center 1x6 concept for this. The center 6 concept would be ambiguous.

     --> center 1x6 girls are tandem single file dixie sashay <ENTER>
     41:   CENTER 1X6, GIRLS ARE TANDEM, SINGLE FILE dixie
        sashay
     
           1B<
         1GV 4G^
      4BV       2B^
         2GV 3G^
           3B>

We didn't type in any of those commas. We should read this line as something like “center column of 6, the girls are in tandem, single file dixie sashay.”

Let's squeeze the galaxy and flip the hourglass.

     42:   squeeze the galaxy
     
           1B<
      4GV       1G^
         2BV 4B^
      3GV       2G^
           3B>
     
     43:   flip the hourglass
     
      1BV   4G^   1GV   4B^
     
      2BV   3G^   2GV   3B^

Just to finish the job, we resolve the sequence. The program will not permit us to write the sequence to the file unless it is resolved. We could notice that slip and rims trade back gives us an allemande left.

     44:   slip
     
      1BV   1G^   4GV   4B^
     
      2BV   2G^   3GV   3B^
     
     45:   rims trade back
     
      1GV   2B^   1BV   4G^
     
      2GV   3B^   4BV   3G^
     
     
          resolve is:
     left allemande  (1/2 promenade)
     46:
     (left waves)-->

The program is still prompting us for more. The facts that we have a resolve, and that the sequence is 45 calls long, don't mean anything to the computer. In order to really write this out we have to give the write this sequence command. We type write this sequence, and press <ENTER>. (We could also have pressed function key <F10>.)

The program prompts us for a comment.

     (left waves)--> write this sequence
     Type comment for this sequence, if desired.
     Enter comment:

At the prompt, we type demo, and then press <ENTER>.

The program then displays

        Appending to existing file.

to let us know that it is writing the sequence to a file, and that there was already a file present under the name sequence.C2, and that it is not destroying whatever sequences were already in that file. It then displays the entire card for our perusal and delectation:

     Wed May 15 21:22:28 1996     Sd31.67:db31.67     C2
            demo
     
     HEADS pass the ocean
     extend
     TANDEM swing thru
     1/2, acey deucey
     GIRLS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     HEADS DISCONNECTED diamond circulate
     CENTER DIAMOND diamond circulate
     CENTER 1X4 swing thru
     HEADS trade the wave
     CENTER 1X6 GRAND swing thru
     CENTERS flip the diamond WHILE THE ENDS explode
       Warning:  Ends should opt for setup parallel to their
        original line -- concentric rule does not apply.
     chain reaction
     ah so
     ENDS hinge
     BOYS IN YOUR DISTORTED DIAMOND diamond circulate
     CENTERS LEFT touch 1/4
     GIRLS IN YOUR DISTORTED WAVE swing thru
     HEADS trail off
     crossfire
     leads press ahead
     DIAGONAL WAVE swing thru
     DIAGONAL COLUMNS OF 3 MAGIC circulate
     girls U-turn back
     girls press ahead
     cross the K
     BOYS single wheel
       Warning:  Check a 'C1 phantom' setup.
     SIAMESE trail to a diamond
     unwrap the interlocked diamonds
     column circulate 1-1/2
     BOYS hinge
     CENTER DIAMOND flip the diamond
     wheel and deal
     tag your neighbor
     sets in motion but hold the column
     CENTERS swing thru
       Warning:  Some people step to a wave.
     CENTERS mix
     SIDES ARE TANDEM, swing and circle 1/4
     CENTERS extend
     trade circulate
     sets in motion but hold the column
     CENTER 1X6, GIRLS ARE TANDEM, SINGLE FILE dixie sashay
     squeeze the galaxy
     flip the hourglass
     slip
     rims trade back
     left allemande  (1/2 promenade)
     
     Sequence written to "sequence.C2".
     Enter startup command>

This sequence is so excessively long that, when you follow this demo on your computer, you very likely won't be able to see it all on your screen, but it's all there.

The program then reassures us that the sequence was written:

        Sequence written to "sequence.C2".

It then prompts us for instructions on starting another sequence:

        Enter startup command>

We could type, for example, sides start, and do the next sequence, or we could type exit.

The file sequence.C2 contains the sequence in all its glory. If we print it out, it would probably take 2 or 3 pages. Don't call this card.